Thursday, October 16, 2014
Q: Does this New Yorker cover illustration resemble your reading nook?
A: Kind of.

Q: Does this New Yorker cover illustration resemble your reading nook?

A: Kind of.






Friday, October 10, 2014
englishmajorhumor:

Born to be Wilde

YES!!!!

englishmajorhumor:

Born to be Wilde

YES!!!!

(Source: misterminola)






Monday, October 6, 2014

Francine Prose’s Household Saints

image

For anyone who’s read light-as-panna cotta romance novels, Francine Prose’s Household Saints begins with what seems like a genre staple: Italian-American butcher Joseph Santangelo wins his wife in a card game. But within a few pages, it’s clear that what Prose has created is not just a meet-cute, but instead a colorful meditation on luck and love, family and faith, set against the backdrop of New York’s Little Italy in the years following World War II.    

Joseph lives with his domineering and superstitious mother, who makes the much-in-demand sausage sold in his shop. While it seems Joseph is at first ambivalent about winning young Catherine Falconetti, who’s put up by her father (which only adds to her family’s reputation for bad luck), the proposal is accepted by a bewildered and naïve Catherine, and evolves into a long-lasting love match.    

The marriage infuriates Joseph’s traditional Italian mother, however, and soon the new family is struggling to blend domineering Mrs. Santangelo’s superstitions with Catherine’s evolving sensibilities, such as her love of celebrity rags, or failings. And she’s a terrible cook.

Once their daughter Theresa is born, the vivid novel moves farther from the delicious details of the Santangelos’ neighborhood streets—where old-school advice clashes with the modernizing New York around them—into the otherworldly mind of a girl obsessed by living a life that emulates her own name-saint, Theresa. Their daughter’s severe and single-minded spirituality at turns irritates and confuses her parents.    

Household Saints builds to an unexpected and shocking conclusion that, while as satisfying as a home-cooked meal, nevertheless leaves one wondering about the meaning—or possibility—of miracles.  

Lisa Chambers is an American writer, journalist, and Italophile living in Rome.

The city of Boston finally makes peace with native son Edgar Allan Poe!

Photo by Jim Badershall.

The city of Boston finally makes peace with native son Edgar Allan Poe!

Photo by Jim Badershall.






Monday, September 15, 2014
unwrapping:

How Authors Should Use Tumblr:A Five-step Guide by Tumblr’s Rachel Fershleiser (from GalleyCat's Jason Boog: "What Writers Need To Know About Tumblr")

Simple and useful!

unwrapping:

How Authors Should Use Tumblr:
A Five-step Guide by Tumblr’s Rachel Fershleiser (from GalleyCat's Jason Boog: "What Writers Need To Know About Tumblr")

Simple and useful!






Tuesday, September 9, 2014
счастливы Толстой рождения

Today’s Google Doodle celebrates War and Peace on what would have been Leo Tolstoy’s 186th birthday.

Leo Tolstoy

Birthday wishes, from all who’ve read Tolstoy, all who aspire to read Tolstoy, and all who pretend they’ve read Tolstoy!






Monday, August 4, 2014
Have you heard of Early Bird Books? It’s a great way to fill your e-reader, without emptying your piggy bank.
When you subscribe, you’ll receive an email every day with free and discounted ebooks: mysteries & thrillers, contemporary & historical romance, literary fiction & memoirs, science fiction & fantasy, classics & bestsellers, and, of course, great YA.
The two best things about Early Bird Books are the curation and prices:
These are high-quality books you’ll want to read (or re-read!).
So far, all of the ebooks are less than $3.00, and each newsletter has something for free. Yes, FREE!
Recent offers have included ebooks by Arthur Hailey, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Erica Jong, David Halberstam, Lawrence Block, Gloria Steinem, Sherman Alexie, Carl Hiaasen, Walter Mosley, and Joyce Maynard.
And these are ebooks you can buy from whichever e-bookseller you like.
Happy reading!

Have you heard of Early Bird Books? It’s a great way to fill your e-reader, without emptying your piggy bank.

When you subscribe, you’ll receive an email every day with free and discounted ebooks: mysteries & thrillers, contemporary & historical romance, literary fiction & memoirs, science fiction & fantasy, classics & bestsellers, and, of course, great YA.

The two best things about Early Bird Books are the curation and prices:

  • These are high-quality books you’ll want to read (or re-read!).
  • So far, all of the ebooks are less than $3.00, and each newsletter has something for free. Yes, FREE!

Recent offers have included ebooks by Arthur Hailey, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Erica Jong, David Halberstam, Lawrence Block, Gloria Steinem, Sherman Alexie, Carl Hiaasen, Walter Mosley, and Joyce Maynard.

And these are ebooks you can buy from whichever e-bookseller you like.

Happy reading!






Friday, August 1, 2014
“I like to eat crawfish and drink beer. That’s despair?”—Walker Percy

Happy International Beer Day! We’ve assembled a list of the best beer quotes from some of our favorite literary authors. Check out the list here, and then go enjoy a brew for us—responsibly, of course.

“I like to eat crawfish and drink beer. That’s despair?”—Walker Percy

Happy International Beer Day! We’ve assembled a list of the best beer quotes from some of our favorite literary authors. Check out the list here, and then go enjoy a brew for us—responsibly, of course.






Tuesday, July 15, 2014
"It never really occurred to me that when it comes to talking funny, people don’t just sound different, they speak differently, using different words to say the same things. So, a list, of things people say in Cajun Louisiana." —Ken Wheaton

"It never really occurred to me that when it comes to talking funny, people don’t just sound different, they speak differently, using different words to say the same things. So, a list, of things people say in Cajun Louisiana." —Ken Wheaton






Monday, July 14, 2014